real robots that stole people job06:19

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Published on 30/08/2016

real robots that stole people job
Don’t look now, but the scary, dystopian themes of a futuristic robot takeover might be slowly playing out in front of our very eyes. As we grow increasingly reliant upon technology, automation and even robotics have taken on a more significant and present role in our everyday lives. Our phones recognize our voices and talk back to us, our cars can remember trips that we’ve previously taken and our computers customize information to better suit our needs. Automation has taken over for human employment in so many ways, as we order lunch from a touch screen, buy groceries at a self-checkout machine and do our banking at an ATM or online.

Robotic technology in the workforce isn’t simply here to stay, but boasts a growing presence. Observers at the forefront of technological development have predicted that humans will end up using robots for a wider variety of tasks that will only grow in complexity as their capabilities continue to advance and their skill set expands to even include responsibilities that demand creativity and recognizing human emotions. If you’re thinking about robots in a Hollywood cinematic sense, think of this new reality as less of a Terminator-style doom and gloom scenario and more of a WALL-E type of gentle, opportunistic takeover.

According to a 2015 report by the Bank of England, robotic machines are poised to take over 80 million American jobs and 15 million British jobs over the course of the next 10 to 20 years. That would represent 50% of the workforce in each of the two countries. Through this scenario, the Bank believes that administrative, clerical and production workers will be the first roles to be wiped out by the rise of automation as humans adapt their skills to fulfill duties that can’t yet be handled by robots. While the Industrial Revolution forced manual laborers to improve their skills to take on more sophisticated, complex jobs, this new era of mechanized development would see the robots use their advanced programming to just replace their human counterparts.

While the report may seem dramatic and shocking, particularly given its two decade or less timetable, it becomes less so when you realize that we are already well into the predicted rise of the machine. In various sectors of employment, jobs are already being done effectively and efficiently by mechanisms possessing artificial intelligence. From multi-billion dollar corporations like Amazon to technology companies like iRobot to even the United Stated military, robotic technology is being looked to as an increasingly viable, cost-effective means of skilled labor as opposed to using a human workforce.

It’s an amazing time that we currently live in, even if we don’t quite realize it yet. Over the past decade or two, technology has evolved at such a remarkable rate that we have come to expect regular new innovations and technological developments to hit the market in rapid succession. Now, we hardly bat an eye if confronted by, say, a prescription-filling robot pharmacist or even a Jeopardy-playing IBM computer named Watson. This might well already be a robot’s world, and we’re just living in it.Don’t look now, but the scary, dystopian themes of a futuristic robot takeover might be slowly playing out in front of our very eyes. As we grow increasingly reliant upon technology, automation and even robotics have taken on a more significant and present role in our everyday lives. Our phones recognize our voices and talk back to us, our cars can remember trips that we’ve previously taken and our computers customize information to better suit our needs. Automation has taken over for human employment in so many ways, as we order lunch from a touch screen, buy groceries at a self-checkout machine and do our banking at an ATM or online.

Robotic technology in the workforce isn’t simply here to stay, but boasts a growing presence. Observers at the forefront of technological development have predicted that humans will end up using robots for a wider variety of tasks that will only grow in complexity as their capabilities continue to advance and their skill set expands to even include responsibilities that demand creativity and recognizing human emotions. If you’re thinking about robots in a Hollywood cinematic sense, think of this new reality as less of a Terminator-style doom and gloom scenario and more of a WALL-E type of gentle, opportunistic takeover.

According to a 2015 report by the Bank of England, robotic machines are poised to take over 80 million American jobs and 15 million British jobs over the course of the next 10 to 20 years. That would represent 50% of the workforce in each of the two countries. Through this scenario, the Bank believes that administrative, clerical and production workers will be the first roles to be wiped out by the rise of automation as humans adapt their skills to fulfill duties that can’t yet be handled by robots. While the Industrial Revolution forced manual laborers to improve their skills to take on more sophisticated, complex jobs, this new era of mechanized development would see the robots use their advanced programming to just replace their human counterparts.

While the report may seem dramatic and shocking, particularly given its two decade or less timetable, it becomes less so when you realize that we are already well into the predicted rise of the machine. In various sectors of employment, jobs are already being done effectively and efficiently by mechanisms possessing artificial intelligence. From multi-billion dollar corporations like Amazon to technology companies like iRobot to even the United Stated military, robotic technology is being looked to as an increasingly viable, cost-effective means of skilled labor as opposed to using a human workforce.

It’s an amazing time that we currently live in, even if we don’t quite realize it yet. Over the past decade or two, technology has evolved at such a remarkable rate that we have come to expect regular new innovations and technological developments to hit the market in rapid succession. Now, we hardly bat an eye if confronted by, say, a prescription-filling robot pharmacist or even a Jeopardy-playing IBM computer named Watson. This might well already be a robot’s world, and we’re just living in it.

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